Courses

Courses Fall 2021 - Spring 2022

History 1155: Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
Professor Tamar Herzog. This course is an introductory survey of European Early Modern history, from the fifteenth to the late eighteenth century. Organized chronologically and thematically, it examines developments from the late Middle Ages to the Age of Revolutions, including the passage from feudalism to urban institutions, the Renaissance, European Expansion overseas, the Protestant and the Catholic Reformations, the Scientific Revolution, the Rise of Absolutism, slavery, the Enlightenment, and Revolutions. Meetings will alternate between lecture and discussion of primary sources (available in English translation).

History 1511: Latin America and the United States

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
Professor Kirsten Weld. Surveys the complex, mutually constitutive, and often thorny relationship - characterized by suspicion and antagonism, but also by fascination and desire - between the United States and the diverse republics south of the Rio Grande. Examines public policy, US expansionism and empire, popular culture and consumption, competing economic development models, migration, tourism, the Cold War, sovereignty, dissent, and contrasting visions of democratic citizenship.

History 1520: Colonial Latin America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
Professor Tamar Herzog. This course is an introductory survey of colonial Latin American history, spanning the sixteenth to the early nineteenth century. Organized chronologically and thematically, it will examine developments in Spanish and Portuguese America by reading both secondary and primary sources (available in English translation).

History 1921/HLS 2700:The History of Law in Europe

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
Professor Tamar Herzog. This is a conference course on the history of law in Europe (including both England and the Continent, as well as Europe’s overseas domains) from the fall of the Roman Empire (5th century) to the establishment of the European Community (20th century). Organized chronologically, it engages with the sources and nature of Law, the organization of legal systems and the relationship between law and society, law and law-maker, law and the legal professions.

History 2707: Comparative Slavery & the Law: Africa, Latin America, & the US: Seminar

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
Professors Emmanuel Akyeampong and Alejandro de la Fuente. This seminar surveys the booming historiographies of slavery and the law in Latin America, the United States, and Africa. Earlier generations of scholars relied heavily on European legal traditions to draw sharp contrasts between U.S. and Latin American slavery. The most recent scholarship, however, approaches the legal history of slavery through slaves' legal initiatives and actions. These initiatives were probably informed by the Africans' legal cultures, as many of them came from societies where slavery was practiced. Our seminar puts African legal regimes (customary law, Islamic law) at the center of our explorations concerning slaves' legal actions in the Americas.

AFRAMER 199X: Social Revolutions in Latin America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022
Professor Alejandro de la Fuente. This course seeks to explain why social revolutions have taken place in Latin America and analyzes their impact on the region. The objective is for students to gain a critical understanding of the origins, development, and impact of revolutionary movements in Latin America during the twentieth century. We will try to identify: (1) the historical factors that led to revolutions in the region (the so-called revolutionary situations); (2) the strategies followed by different movements and how successful they were; (3) the programs and policies instituted by the different revolutionary governments; (4) the social and political forces opposed to those policies, including international forces; and (5) the ability of these revolutionary movements to hold on to power for extended periods of time. The course examines several case studies, which may include Mexico, Cuba, Chile, Nicaragua, the Zapatista uprising in Chiapas, and the so-called "Bolivarian revolution" of Venezuela. Our goal is to identify similarities and differences among these cases.

History 13E: History of Modern Mexico

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022
Professor Kirsten Weld. This course explores the history of Mexico in the 19th and 20th centuries, emphasizing the importance of historical approaches to understanding critical phenomena in contemporary Mexican affairs. Topics covered include colonial legacies, race and ethnicity, the Mexican Revolution, the border, nation-building and development, Mexico-US relations, popular culture, economic crisis, the Zapatista rebellion, narco-violence and the "war on drugs," and migration.
 

History 2510: History and Memory in Latin America: Seminar

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022
Professor Kirsten Weld. In this seminar, participants will use archival resources available at Harvard to carry out original research on a topic of their choice related to the seminar theme of history and memory in Latin America. Early sessions will be devoted to a series of foundational readings; later sessions will be spent workshopping and presenting research-in-progress.